Critiquing Elementary Lesson Plans

The first lesson plan I am going to critique is geared towards elementary students, covering figurative language.  I believe that the use of figurative language and creative writing is an extremely important topic that students should learn early and continue to develop as they grow older.

This lesson plan is very effective; it clearly states the objectives, procedures, and how the students will be assessed at the end of the assignment.  The lesson plan also connects with the Common Core State Standards for language arts and writing by demonstrating an understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.  The objective of this lesson plan is for students to do the following:

  • Create a PowerPoint show illustrating two types of figurative language. As an alternative, students will use an interactive online tool to create a similar slideshow presentation, using a site such as Zoho Show. (This site is easier to use than PowerPoint, and free.  Zoho Show also allows students to collaborate, even on different computers with a simple URL address).
  • Demonstrate understanding of personification by creating and interpreting simple examples.
  • Demonstrate understanding of alliteration by creating and interpreting simple examples

The lesson plan continues with a list of materials needed to complete the assignment as well as procedures for the students to follow.  Students will review the concepts of alliteration and personification using different interactive websites provided by the teacher.  They will then start to model their project following the slide requirements for their slideshow, also provided by the teacher.  Before the students begin working on their computerized slideshow, they will need to start brainstorming creative examples of both alliteration and personification using idea cards that may be either digital or non-digital. Once students complete the foundation of the assignment, they are ready to begin their projects.

Depending on students’ familiarity with technology, they have the option to start their power point from scratch, or use a pre-made template.  Each slide should contain examples of alliteration and personification.  Students should also color code and underline the word being personified (on the personification slide) and the alliterative letters (on the alliteration slide). If this project is completed on Microsoft PowerPoint, students will travel from computer to computer and look at their classmates’ projects.  However, if students completed this project using Zoho, they will be able to give their presentations using the interactive SMARTBoard, where students can narrate their own presentations.

When assessing students, the teachers must ensure that students demonstrate that they are comfortable using PowerPoint or Zoho software, and display proficiency in the specified content areas.

I think this lesson plan has the potential to be very beneficial for students.  It not only enhances the level of collaboration among and between students, but also helps facilitate the students’ learning from each other.  What I also find valuable about this lesson plan is how it purposefully integrates technology, and can easily be comprehended by students in elementary school.

Another lesson plan I am going to critique is one that I observed – personally — at the AT&T Classroom.  Before I continue, let me tell you a little about the AT&T Classroom.  It is located on campus at Kent State University that elicits 21st century learning.  The classroom is equipped with technologies — iPads and laptops available to every student — as well as a large interactive SMARTBoard, an Apple TV, and a digital presentation station.  Local teachers bring in their students for a half-day, daily, for six weeks during which they utilize these digital tools.  For more information regarding the AT&T Classroom, visit the AT&T Classroom website.

This lesson plan is also geared towards elementary students; however in this lesson, students are learning about coding and programming games.  This lesson is technology-based in which students use their iPads and the app “Hopscotch” to create their own games.  To learn more about this app, visit the “Hopscotch” website.

As I observed this lesson plan, I noticed how clearly the instructor related it to the students.  The objectives, procedures, and assessment were precise, unambiguous, and easily understood by the students.  The objectives of the lesson are quite simple:

  • Students will code their own game by following along with the instructor’s step-by-step instructions
  • Students will demonstrate their knowledge in game coding using “Hopscotch”

It is now time to get to work.  Since the students are only 7-8 years old, they are unable to completely code games by themselves, so they follow along with the instructor while he/she demonstrates the step-by-step process.  This process is very sequential and it is crucial that students pay very close attention.  Students create new rules — such as “move forward 100” or “jump at 500,100” — to move the different objects in the game.

Once the students have completed the coding process, it is time to try out their creations.  They are assessed on this assignment simply based on whether or not their game works properly.

I find this lesson plan very valuable to students.  Not only are they introduced to new technologies, but they are also learning and understanding complicated skills.  As technology keeps improving, the demand for people who are able to demonstrate coding skills increases tremendously.  Without the implementation of technology in this lesson plan, kids would not get the hands-on experience, or be able to fully understand the process of programming and coding games.

Advertisement

2 thoughts on “Critiquing Elementary Lesson Plans

  1. Very nice! From: allisonlebo To: blebo3@yahoo.com Sent: Sunday, February 8, 2015 4:53 PM Subject: [New post] Critiquing Elementary Lesson Plans #yiv2686386242 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv2686386242 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv2686386242 a.yiv2686386242primaryactionlink:link, #yiv2686386242 a.yiv2686386242primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv2686386242 a.yiv2686386242primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv2686386242 a.yiv2686386242primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv2686386242 WordPress.com | allisonlebo posted: “The first lesson plan I am going to critique is geared towards elementary students, covering figurative language.  I believe that the use of figurative language and creative writing is an extremely important topic that students should learn early and cont” | |

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s